Creating Your Blog Post

Did you know that all members of the Partnership Learning Community are welcome to create blog posts?

Feel free to author posts anytime you have something to share  - either about projects you are involved in that you think will interest the PLC community, or updates about your work as a Conversation Leader or Partnership movement-builder.  

It is easy to make a post - just follow the instructions below and have fun!

Instructions for posting and publishing on the Blog

All Posts (153)

  • On October 18th, I gathered together eight of my activist friends to make a PowerPoint presentation of "The Caring Economy Movement" and to have a rich conversation about the material. The picture above is what we saw out of the window where we were holding the presentation. Though I was certainly preaching to the choir, as the participants were all fellow activists and teachers (caregivers), I also knew that they would be great people for feedback in terms of what would work best in the future as I advocated for the Caring Economy Movement with different groups of people in my community.  I was not disappointed. There were two significant remarks:   

    1) There was amazement at how well the presentation pulled together multiple sectors of concern that we all cared about in our current volunteer efforts in multiple fields of education, poverty, healthcare, family leave practices, elder care and the political arena. Whereas we have all felt isolated at times in our own specialty areas, it was great to see how we could work together in manifesting a Caring Economy and address all issues in the process. The presentation validates so many people in their fields of caring work and that pulling us all together for shared cause did not go unnoticed.

    2) Applause was given for the emphasis in our presentation that caring is a human value no matter whether it is women or men who deliver the action of care. My friends were pleased that we were moving beyond emphasizing the rankism of men over women of the past, and that we were focusing on visioning caring as a human value - supporting both men and women in taking caring actions.    

    One conversation about the domination/partnership model was particularly poignant. It was fascinating that all attendees were women who were schooled to be domination leaders in order to be considered successful in “market economy eyes”. Each had their story of how they experienced the exhaustion of the domination end of the continuum in trying to sustain a power over and control way of working with people. That experience created great empathy for all leaders, and men in particular, as well as it fueling their greater determination to move toward the partnership end of the continuum through their own modeling in the leadership positions they hold today.  

    As a conversation leader, I have the following goals and intentions:

    1) To attend the local “Caring Economy Movement” group that meets once a month at the local Unitarian Church in Albuquerque.

    2) To seek out friend’s homes, and /or groups where I can make a similar presentations at least once each quarter of a year.

    3) To create a book study series on the relationship types mentioned in Riane’s book “The Power of Partnership” and offer it through the Institute for Relationship Education where I work.

    4) To read more of Riane’s books and take the “Power of Partnership” class online with Sarah.  

    As I will be offering many different classes on relationship education online, please feel free to go to www.instituteforrelationshipeducation.com to view the offerings which will begin in 2016. 

     I look forward to connecting with and sharing many stories with other conversation leaders in the years ahead. 

    Namaste - Wendy of Bee Cohort - Fall 2015

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  • To amplify the narrative of local strides within the Fight for 15 movement, the students at the University of Pittsburgh have organized to coalesce support around the beginning of the current semester.

    Guest speakers include Gabe Kramer, campaign director for SEIU; Chris Ellis, McDonald's worker and Fight for 15 leader, and Randa Darling, campaign organizer for UFCW 23, alongside workers from Conflict Kitchen.

    Gabe will be giving some labor history background and tying it into the current Fight for 15 movement. Chris will give us updates regarding the April 15 national day of action and other summer actions that occurred across the state. Randa will then speak about her experience organizing food and commercial workers and more specifically her experience working with the employees at Conflict Kitchen. 

    We hope that this event will spark discussion and we can continue to work together to build a movement for a living wage and jobs with dignity!

    This event is co-sponsored by the Caring Economy Campaign and AIDPitt /USAS Local #13.

     

    Slide15.jpg

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  • CPS’ Alumni news: Greetings from the Himalayas!

    Roxanne Gupta, graduate of Riane Eisler's Cultural Transformation Course, wrote to us this past week from India:

    “I had a great opportunity to speak to the women studying in the year long Nurses Training Program at the Kumaon Community College in Ranikhet, Kumaon region, Himalayas in India about Riane's work on the Caring Economy. I explained some of the basic ideas about women's work counting and also about gender equality having to begin in the home and school at an early age.

    The women were quick to pick up on the ideas and were very enthusiastic. I gave them the name of [the Caring Economy Campaign] website and they wanted to look it up. Their English was fairly good. Perhaps they will be able to pursue further education online [through CPS’ Leadership & Learning Programs].  I am also using [Riane’s book] The Real Wealth of Nations in my Human Security course with the University of Pittsburgh Semester in the Himalayas Program”.

    Thank you Roxanne for your wide-reaching and exciting world-work connecting these nursing students in India with the work of the Center for Partnership Studies. Keep in touch with us as you continue your community advocacy—you are an inspiration to leaders around the world! http://caringeconomy.org/

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  • Empowerment through ownership: This weekend, Sept. 2, 2015, a coalition of national, Pennsylvania and Pittsburgh area public policy advocacy organizations will host a one day webinar and forum to support and strengthen “the vital role of public and worker ownership in wide segments of the US and global economy.” Jason Campbell, forum coordinator, believes that SWEIs can play a vital role in the evolution of our economic system, serving the public sector in ways that create equity and empowerment.

    Campbell, Caring Economy Campaign volunteer SWEIs researcher and certified Caring Economy Community Advocate: “The private sector is very good at advancing private profit, but in many important ways is failing to generate prosperity for average Americans. We need a public sector antidote, with a strong dose of public ownership.”

    Featured speakers include Thomas M. Hanna, Director of Research for the Democracy Collaborative, and Mike Krauss, Founder of the Public Bank Institute and Chair of the Pennsylvania Project.

    The event will be presented live and online.  For live attendance registration is required as seating is limited. Lunch will be provided for those attending.

    For information on the link and to register to attend please contact: jtc52@pitt.edu

    The program is organized by the Pennsylvania Project, the Public Banking Institute and the Institute for Green Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University with support of the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, the Metropolitan Action Group and the Thomas Merton Center.

    Read more in the Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1652283538321476/

     

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  • It is an honor very first academic journal article was published in The Interdisciplinary Journal of Partnership Studies, co-founded by Riane Eisler. I would love to share it with you. It is a free access journal so you can download the article. (click the link below & then click the "download" link in the upper right hand corner)

    Bringing Partnership Home: A Mode of Family Transformation

    Abstract:

    Eisler’s cultural transformation theory suggests that the global crises we face can be addressed only through movement to a partnership model of social organization. Drawing on cultural transformation theory and systems theory, a partnership model of family organization (PMFO) is outlined as a practical framework to guide families toward partnership relations. Eight components of PMFO are presented and expanded on as a path toward furthering familial and societal transformation. The eight tenets of a PMFO are: 1) cooperative adult leadership, 2) connecting orientation, 3) caretaking emphasis, 4) collaborative roles and rules, 5) celebration of unique contributions, 6) compassionate communication, 7) conscious language use, and 8) collection and creation of partnership stories. Finally, specific strategies of application of the PMFO will be discussed.

    Keywords

    Cultural transformation theory, marriage and family therapy, family organization, partnership model, dominator model, partnership model of family organization, family life, partnership studies, partnership families

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  • Young Women Leaders Project Paper

    Here's what I wrote a little over a month ago about girls/women in society.
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  • Introducing Myself: Blog Post

    Hi, my name is Sophia Ashworth and I am fifteen-years-old and am a sophomore at Woodside High School.  I did the Young Women Leaders Program and loved it! Everyone was very open and willing to talk about themselves and their experiences with current sexism, self-image hating, and women’s role as leaders. It was great to be able to talk with everyone virtually. Even though we never met in person, we still felt comfortable sharing and discussing with each other. It was great to be able to meet people sharing similar interests and opinions, which made it especially easy to connect. Brie Mathers introduced me to this program and I’m so glad I got to do it! Since I am Vice-President of my class at Woodside, I would love to implement some of Brie’s “Love the Skin You’re In” messages and teachings from the Young Women Leaders Program into board meeting discussions and possibly an activity. Girls in society today lack the self-confidence they need to succeed, and women’s roles in leadership positions are undervalued and not present. I’m happy to be a part of the movement to change that. :)

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  • A Partnership for Food Security

    by Kirstin Kelley, Social Media Manager, Center for Partnership Studies

    A year ago my boyfriend, Kevin, and I were earning so little that we were skipping meals and eating nutrient-deficient ramen noodles to keep the hunger pains at bay. I looked for more work and took on my role at the Center for Partnership studies as social media manager and a few other odd jobs that would work around my schedule as a graduate student. I finished school in December and found more work as a professional writer, a job that I find incredibly fulfilling, and Kevin and I started to look for our next opportunity. Kevin was offered a job that paid considerably more in another state, and we found we could also get more affordable housing, so we packed up and moved. All of our changes still weren’t enough to find ourselves eating as well as we would have liked, even though we were in a much better place, so I started exploring new options.

    In college, our campus farm was part of a movement for sustainable agriculture called Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). The idea is that community members can pay a fee to get a portion of whatever the farm has available on a schedule. I thought this could be a solution for Kevin and me, so I looked into local CSA programs to find a farm that would fit our needs best- affordable with a good variety and in an amount and frequency that made sense for us.  One farm stood out, so I went ahead and ordered our first box. 

    Now, for $80 each month, Kevin and I get plenty of fresh produce to cover most of our needs. We still have to supplement our farm box with other types of foods, but it keeps our grocery bill much more manageable and helps keep our diet more varied. And the improvement is showing; my parents came to visit after our first box arrived, and noticed that we looked physically healthier- and we felt it, too. All told, we’re now spending between $200 and $400 every month for food- a far cry from the $1000 we’d needed to try to budget before.

    Kevin and I had been experiencing food insecurity. We couldn’t depend on our incomes to guarantee regular or nutritious meals, but through finding a CSA in our area, we’ve been able to mostly overcome that particular economic challenge.

    CSAs represent a strong example of partnership culture- they connect farmers directly with consumers, circumventing industrial agriculture and reducing the cost by eliminating the need for grocery stores to serve as a middle man and for fossil fuels to transport produce long distances. They’re better for the environment because the impact of small-scale farming is much less than a more industrial model, and they often reject the use of pesticides that kill bees and seep into the soils and groundwater. It’s rare that a single program can make positive changes in so many different arenas.

    This food option has been gaining popularity recently, but it still has a long way to go to become viable for most people suffering from food insecurity. Overwhelmingly, CSAs serve high-income communities, but that is starting to change, and some are doing even better than the one Kevin and I are using.

    In our area, another CSA is operating a community garden in an underserved part of town where residents can help with the growing process to get food at a more reduced cost or can pay a fee for their own plot in the garden to grow their own food. This garden is also teaching kids in the area about where their food comes from. And having this garden is also giving community members a space to spend time outside that is safe and unpaved.

    Maybe we’ll see more CSAs and community gardens help fight food insecurity in the future.

    http://caringeconomy.org/a-partnership-for-food-security/

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  • WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT SPARKS ECONOMIC SUCCESS

    We have created new downloadable resources for you: Fast Fact sheets are now posted on the Caring Economy Campaign’s website. CPS’ Social Wealth Economic Indicators demonstrate that the status of women is a powerful predictor of both national economic success and a higher quality of life for all.

    Here are the facts: http://caringeconomy.org/fast-facts/

    Other data topics include:

    Children – the Nation's Best Investment

    Capitalism and Care: Can They Be Partners?

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  • Send me some good thoughts tomorrow around 12:45. I hope to win some of the mostly men over. This won't be the most receptive group but I want to start breaking up the ground.

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  • Netflix announces "unlimited" paid parental leave for moms and dads

    Although the U.S. and Papua New Guinea are the only countries among 185 nations that have not yet imposed government-mandated policies requiring employers to offer paid maternity leave, American tech companies like Microsoft, Netflix, Google and Intel are ahead of the curve. Tech industry companies are paving the way for improved baby-benefit policies. Netflix recently announced that it would provide up to one year of paid leave for parents with new babies. Microsoft followed suit: It’s increasing paid leave to 20 weeks for moms and 12 weeks for dads.

    The Caring Economy Campaign supports the value of the vital work of care in our workplaces, and applauds the forward-thinking vision of these employers. 

    Where tech industry companies stand in paid maternity leave policies:

    Netflix:  up to one year for moms and dads

    Microsoft:  20 weeks for moms and 12 weeks for dads

    Yahoo: 16 weeks for moms and eight weeks for dads

    Intel: 13 weeks + eight weeks of paid “bonding” leave

    Google: 16 weeks

    Facebook: 16 weeks

    Read more:

    http://www.blogher.com/netflix-announces-unlimited-maternity-leave

    http://www.businessinsider.com/netflix-announces-unlimited-maternity-and-paternity-leave-2015-8

    http://www.siliconbeat.com/2015/08/05/bigger-better-parental-leave-first-netflix-now-microsoft/

    http://finance.yahoo.com/news/netflix-workers-babies-paid-leave-234154689.html?soc_src=mediacontentstory&soc_trk=ma

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  • Fremont, CA: American High School English teacher John Creger writes about his popular and revolutionary Personal Creed project for high school students.

    https://jcreger.wordpress.com/2015/07/22/the-personal-creed-project-and-the-return-of-reflection/

    Since 2013, several of John’s students have completed the Center for Partnership Studies’ Young Leaders Program.

    John’s student Kaavya writes:
    “The serious lack of thoughtful self-reflection, and no I don’t mean write about your favorite food, points to a serious flaw in [standard high school] curriculum. After doing the Creed Project I’m in way better touch with my inner self and I really fail to see how today’s youth can make the world a better place if they don’t understand who they are.”

    Young Leaders Program participants work together to broaden their self-empowerment and leadership skills in the context of the Partnership model. Support the Young Women Leaders Program: https://www.blupela.com/initiative.php?id=202/Young-Women-Leaders-Program

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  • A Chalice for Change

    Here is a model beyond racial, class, and gender segregation that lies us down in the nurturing arms of mothers everyone whose endless toil is valued so that we can nourish a new humanity that is strong not for its brute force, but its capacity to yield. Practical, proven, and timeless, the new system offers a way of life in which no one need be left behind.
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  • The Caring Economy Campaign is excited to announce that Michigan state policy officials announced the deployment of a new social wellbeing measurement tool in Michigan called the Social Progress Index (SPI).

    The Social Progress Index, developed by the Social Progress Imperative, measures social and environmental outcomes – such as access to basic human needs, health and education, and the ability for people to improve their own lives – and serves as a complementary measure to Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Michigan will serve as the first state for deployment of the Social Progress Index in the United States.

    http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/michigan-selected-as-first-us-state-for-deployment-of-new-social-progress-index-300089464.html

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  • Caring Policies Work.   Switzerland, the Netherlands, Iceland, New Zealand, Canada, Sweden, etc. every nation on this Happiness index have a long term commitment and investment in caring for citizens and communities.   Investing into education, health, and community works for our highest long term good as societies.  

    Happiness Report 2015 at Shareable

    “The care of human life and happiness…is the only legitimate object of good government,”
    —Thomas Jefferson, 1809.

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  • Found this book and review at Mind and Life Institute's blog and thought this would be of interest to our CELP alumni community.

    Caring Economics

    Caring Economics

    “What is the relevance of pro-social motivation and altruism in competitive systems such as the dominant Western economic system?” This is one of the questions that was posed during the 2010 Mind and Life dialogue entitled “Altruism and Compassion in Economic Systems: A Dialogue at the Interface of Economics, Neuroscience, and Contemplative Sciences.” We are so pleased to announce the publication of Caring Economics—the latest in the series of books based on these dialogues.

    In 2010, international experts in psychology, contemplative science, and neuroscience gathered to share in this dialogue. The thread that wove through the conversation was their interest in economic decision-making, cooperation, and pro-social emotions and behavior, along with a mutual inquiry into innovative economic systems that could lead to a global economy focused on compassion and altruism.

    In Caring Economics, edited by MLI board member Tania Singer and Fellow Matthieu Ricard, we have the opportunity to re-experience those conversations. Each chapter consists of a presentation by an expert in the field, followed by a discussion with the Dalai Lama in which he offers his response and his own unique insights on the subject. As the Dalai Lama states, this dialogue leads us to perhaps the most important need of all, “to examine the connection between economic systems and our quest for happiness.”

    Caring Economics

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  • Muhammad Waseem Ayaz, a recent graduate of Riane Eisler’s Cultural Transformation Course, is a student of Sociology at the Government College of Science, in Lahore, Pakistan. He is completing his final thesis on the impact of online communities on cultural transformation in Pakistan. In conjunction with his study he is an intern at the NGO 'Idara Khidmat-e-Insaniyat, Lahore-Pakistan' which assists lost children in the community to reconnect with their parents. Waseem made this short video sharing his experiences in the course and his gratitude for our programs.

    Our gratitude to you, Waseem for your creative leadership and valuable contributions to positive cultural transformation!

    Watch his short video here.

    You can contact Waseem at wasimayyaz@gmail.com

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  • by Allison Stevens, Women's eNews

    There's nothing like the "fatherhood bonus" for moms. To the contrary, moms hit the "maternal wall," get slammed with the "mommy-tax" and pay the "motherhood penalty." Mothers have more difficulty advancing in their careers, don't get paid as much as women without children, men or men with children and lose big for taking time out of the workforce to care for the family.

    http://womensenews.org/story/momagenda/150507/dear-mom-thanks-nurturing-the-us-economy?

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  • Far too little attention has been paid to systemic crimes that take the lives of many millions of women and girls every year.

    Riane Eisler has authored an article in the Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, (Vol. 7 Iss: 2, pp.88 - 100). The purpose of the paper is to detail a proposal to use international law to hold governments and/or their agents accountable when they fail to protect the female half of humanity from widespread and egregious crimes of violence.

    Seven crimes and their personal, social, and economic consequences are analyzed, and legal remedies are detailed: selective female infanticide and denial to girl children of food and health care; the sex trade and sexual slavery; female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C); domestic violence (from murder in the name of honor and bride burning to acid throwing and battery); rape; child marriage and forced marriage.

    This paper explores a new approach for use by scholars, attorneys, and human rights activists to end the global pandemic of violence against the female half of humanity by invoking the Rome Statute and/or amending it to protect women and girls. It provides a new legal and sociological analysis.

    See http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/JACPR-12-2013-0036

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  • As I sat in the charming "Renaissance" music room inside of the sacred circle our group had formed at the Glen Muse Estate, a powerful insight rose into the forefront of my awareness. A familiar warm rush traveled along the surface of my skin to signal to my somatic wisdom that an epiphany was rising up - clearly being ushered forth for the collective benefit of our pod gathered there in Southern California. We found ourselves communing out of an inspiration to hear, discover and learn more about Riane's growing Caring Economy Coalition... cradled within the beautiful sanctuary of Ojai (known to Annie Besant as the spiritual Valley of Moon.) 
                                                                                             
    My goal was to empower these community leaders to engage with relevant components of this compelling platform that C.P.S. has brilliantly and comprehensively mapped out in order to enrich, strengthen and expand their own innovative branches of Evolutionary Economics. The personal intention that I set was that every emissary present was to depart with an expanded tool kit as well as valuable resources to assist them in bringing these transformational 'Relationship Culture' distinctions into key areas of their lives. My prayer was that the collective exploration would land the blessings of this initial presentation in a manner that allowed them the opportunity to really embody the wisdom for both their personal and professional lives.
                                                                                       
    Thus, I found myself seeing Bill Grace's words "GRACIOUS SPACE" flashing across the canvass of my mind, and my heart was feeling and listening to the many different reflections that were being funneling into the active center of our group's exchange. Spontaneously a unique bridge was born, and I heard the term (after weeks of reviewing the CAP slides) "high quality human capitol" on a whole different bandwidth. These words emerged anew as my wonderful colleague was discussing the importance of mentoring our next generation of 'social artists' to be fully operational or successful in expressing their highest life's purpose, calling, and dharmic blueprint.
                                                                                              
    All of a sudden years of introducing Conscious ConceptionBirthing a New Humanity and Limbic Birth Imprint authors and trainers to each other naturally converged with years of networking with a whole host of Sacred CommerceSpiritual Economics and Soul of Money, etc... visionaries, path finders, and fellow trail blazers. My whole nervous system went, WOW!

    What I got present to was the specific need to care for the strategic development of people's greatest gifts during the early hypnagogic years of life ( the first six years of a child's life - Bruce H. Lipton Ph.D) when our entire "life strategy templates" are being designed from the perceptual filters of our subconscious mind. If our emerging social architects and evolutionary economic engineers could remind innovators that "poverty is never really a lack of resource - it's about a lack of resourcefulness," then humanity would be stimulated to remember that WE carry all of the remarkable, creative and out of the box solutions to our world's difficult challenges inside of the inherent genius of our true consciousness. For the cooperative nature of the international BLUE Economy is all about encouraging "quadruple bottom line" answers to the plethora of issues that our CEC's Social Wealth Economic Indicators outline; and therefore, caring for our next generation is not just limited to their physical, emotional, mental or environmental well-being.
                                                                                            
    The invitation that became clear was the opportunity to translate for progressive businesses that it's not just about covering the costs of childcare and care giving... for the reason that if we can have a generation of children that get to grow up on this planet... without the negative programming, societal conditioning, ancestral habituation, or institutional ignorance of the old dominator culture's multi-generational limbic birth imprints... then we can midwife a whole paradigm shift of "wealth through human potential currency." This would then stimulate an exponentially opening in our collective field of view regarding "what's truly possible," and this wave is meant to be a co-creative choice that we can all navigate together inside of our flourishing new models around the globe!
                                                                                             
    Therefore, I really thank you (the viewer) for reading this blog post from a multi-intelligence perspective, and I am really passionate about continuing to produce a whole host of different panels, interactive seminars, and team summits (with my destiny partner Steven M. Ehlinger from Holonomics) to anchor flexible networks that will support the new emergence of our "Partnership Economies." I offer much gratitude to this entire community for making this dream a reality through all of our combined efforts, and I do look forward to my very first alumni call this Friday, May 8th with more of you!!
                                                                                                
    ==> Note: There are more pictures on my Facebook page
    The Path to Real Prosperity - Creating A Caring Economy
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